The day FIDE temporarily moved to Buenos Aires and Mr. Augusto De Muro was elected its President: Closer to the recognition by the world entity of a historical truth

By Sergio E. Negri & Juan S. Morgado

When we originally wrote in 2018 in Spanish an article (later revised and expanded) on a historical episode that was at the bottom of the chest of memories, pertaining to the day that FIDE decided to move its headquarters to Buenos Aires and elect Argentine Mr. Augusto de Muro as President of the world federative entity (as a result of the start of hostilities that gave rise to what will immediately be called World War II), of course we intended to reflect a forgotten factual truth.

But, additionally, we had the hope that institutionally it would be operated to recognize some facts that had fallen within the framework of what we call, somewhat bitterly, as the product of a “historical surgery”.

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Gideon Ståhlberg, A Swedish Lion in Argentina

Por Peter Holmgren

Juan S. Morgado asked me to write a few words about Gideon Ståhlberg to be published on the date of his death, May 26. Having been working on his biography for more than four years, my first thought was to select one chapter but found that to be too detailed and not to give the right view of Ståhlberg’s fascinating career. Instead I hope you will enjoy reading about some highlights from his career.

When Gideon Ståhlberg arrived in Buenos Aires in 1939 on board the Piriápolis, the Noah’s Ark of chess players, he was already a well-known grandmaster but still improving. Ståhlberg was now the undisputed leader of the Swedish national team, one of the strongest in the world. Unfortunately Gösta Stoltz was not able to join for Argentina and the stand-in Nils Bergkvist was not of the same caliber. Still Sweden finished on an honorable fourth place.

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Lewis Carroll envisioned his Alice playing chess

By Sergio Negri

If we were to create a list of notable writers who made significant contributions to chess, along with Alfonso X of Castile — also known as "the Wise" — Stefan Zweig, Vladimir Nabokov and Jorge Luis Borges, we would have to include Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (1832-1898), that is to say Lewis Carroll, the pseudonym chosen by the Briton to present his literary work. | Photo: Carroll's historical self-portrait
Nota publicada en el sitio en idioma inglés de ChessBase, en traducción de Carlos Colodro. En  https://en.chessbase.com/post/lewis-carroll-y-su-alicia-jugando-al-ajedrez-por-sergio-negri-2018. 

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Expo in Dubai: memories of the future

By Sergio Negri

The International Chess Federation (FIDE) officially announced that the match for the world championship that will face the current holder of the world, the Norwegian Magnus Carlsen, with the winner of the Candidates Tournament that is expected to take place in Yekaterinburg (Russia) from 15 In March, it will be hosted by the city of Dubai (United Arab Emirates) as of November 2021, within the framework of Expo 2020 (its original opening date postponed due to the effects of the pandemic).

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Franz Kafka, “Bauer eines Bauern”

Von Sergio Ernesto Negri

Es ist allgemein nicht sehr bekannt, dass Franz Kafka Schach gespielt hat. In Kafkas Schachbibliothek wurden u.a. folgende Bücher gefunden: “Das Endspiel im Schach” von Hans Fahrni; “300 Endspiele” von Henri Rinck; “Bilguers Schachhandbuch” (8. Auflage, überarbeitet von Carl Schlechter); “15 ausgewählte Partien aus Jacques Mieses Karschau-Turnier 1918”. In seinen Tagebüchern finden sich jedoch keine Hinweise darauf. Im Oktober 1911 nahm Kafka in Prag an einer Simultanvorstellung teil, die von dem jungen Jose Raul Capablanca gegeben wurde.

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